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SJS Awareness LA Sponsors “Running to Spread Awareness” 5k and 1k Fun Run

Oct 07, 2015 11:17AM, Published by Staff Writer, Categories: Health, Acadiana Life




Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) (aka Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Syndrome (TENS)) is a severe allergic drug reaction. It includes painful blistering of the skin and mucous membrane involvement. As it progresses, the skin literally burns from the inside out and sloughs off in sheets. Ocular involvement includes severe conjunctivis, iritis, palpebral edema, conjunctival and corneal blisters and erosions, and corneal symptoms and high fever. If the skin or organs become infected, long term damage or death may occur. This is why awareness and early detection is so important.

The family of Paige LaCombe, a little girl from Lafayette who suffered from SJS/TENS, helped to form the foundation of SJS Awareness Louisiana. SJS Awareness LA’s mission is to spread awareness of early detection and warning signs. Stevens Johnson Syndrome can happen to anyone and education in early detection is KEY. Since forming the organization, they have reached out to multiple families experiencing the syndrome.

One of the ways SJS Awareness Louisiana raises funds is their annual 5k and 1k fun run “Running to Spread Awareness”, in partnership with Shriners Hospitals for Children. This year’s event will take place on October 10, 2015 at Scott Park.

For additional information, contact: Renee LaCombe at sjslouisiana@gmail.com or visit www.sjslouisiana.com



Renee LaCombe Paige LaCombe Stevens Johnson Syndrome SJS Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Syndrome


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